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Five Yoga Positions that Can Help with Chronic Back Pain

If you’re suffering from chronic back pain, you’re not alone. Each year millions of people experience back pain symptoms ranging from mild to debilitating. The good news is that there are many things you can do to alleviate your pain, from strengthening core muscles to making sure you don’t sit for extended periods. Yoga can be excellent for many people with chronic back pain – check out these five poses that may help.

Downward-Facing Dog

Even if you don’t have much experience with yoga, you probably know this popular pose. Downward dog benefits the entire body – it elongates the spine while strengthening the core, lower back, and hamstrings. It’s easy to get into this pose, too. Get on your hands and knees with your toes tucked under. Then, raise your hips toward the ceiling as you push your heels into the floor. Keep your back and legs straight. Hold for five slow breaths, relaxing into the stretch.

Upward-Facing Dog

From downward dog, the upward dog is a smooth transition. Shift your body forward into a plank position. Point your toes back with the tops of your feet on the floor. Look upward as you keep your knees lifted off the ground. Hold for three slow breaths. This pose opens up the chest and improves the flexibility of your abs and back.

Low Lunge with Back Bend

This pose can stretch and strengthen your entire back. Begin in a low lunge position and slowly deepen the lunge until your back knee is on the floor. Raise your arms up until they are beside your ears and lean back gently. For an extra neck release, place your hands behind your head and interlace your fingers. Hold this pose for three slow breaths.

Seated Forward Fold

Sit on the floor with your legs out in front of you and your back straight. Slowly walk your hands down your legs as far as you can. If you can grab your toes, do so – if not, reach as far as you can comfortably. You’ll feel an excellent hamstring stretch even if you rest your hands on your shins. You’ll know where to stop because you’ll feel a gentle stretch – if it feels too intense or painful, back off and hold a more comfortable position. This stretch is great for lengthening the hamstrings and back and helping you relax. Hold for several slow breaths, relaxing into the stretch – you’ll probably find that you can stretch a little farther with each exhale.

Seated Spinal Twist

The seated spinal twist improves both your spine mobility and your posture. Start in a seated position with your left foot crossed over your right leg, knee bent so that your left foot is positioned against the outside of your right knee. Lift your right arm and hook your right elbow on the outside of your right knee. Gently looking over your left shoulder will give you a nice twist/stretch that feels great. Hold for three slow breaths and repeat on the other side.

Back Pain Specialists Ramsey NJ

Failed Back Surgery (Post Lumbar Laminectomy Syndrome)

Failed Back Surgery (Post Lumbar Laminectomy Syndrome)

 

Choosing to undergo back surgery is not a decision to take lightly. Even minor operations require a good deal of discussion and careful consideration between the surgeon and patient beforehand. Why? Virtually any invasive procedure carries some risk for complications. Most surgeons will require their patients to exhaust conservative treatment options first–including medications, injections, and physical therapy–before deciding to go under the knife.

Of course, this is not to say that surgery is never indicated. Hundreds of thousands of people every year undergo spinal surgery as a “last resort” when conservative measures don’t work. However, it’s been estimated that as many as 20% of these people fail to achieve a significant improvement in their back pain. This failure of symptom relief following back surgery is often called post lumbar laminectomy syndrome.

 

Why Do Some Back Surgeries Fail to Relieve Symptoms or Improve Function?

 

If you’ve had back surgery and have failed to see any meaningful improvement in your pain and dysfunction, there could be several reasons why you’re dealing with this. Recurring or continued nerve root compression, for instance, may be present. Likewise, there could be ongoing inflammation and/or scar tissue formation. Mobility and stability issues within nearby spinal joints could also be to blame.

Lastly, persistent back pain–even after a back surgery intended to relieve a person’s suffering–may be related to, if not directly caused by, other underlying conditions including diabetes, peripheral vascular disease, depression, anxiety, autoimmune disorders, sleep disorders, and smoking.

 

How Our Ramsey Pain Management Team Can Help You After a Failed Back Surgery

 

Understandably, the emotional, physical, and even financial implications of post lumbar laminectomy syndrome can be quite serious. At Progressive Spine & Sports Medicine, our Ramsey pain management team, led by Dr. Steven Ferrer and Dr. Kevin McElroy can offer several comprehensive treatment options that can get you the relief you’ve been hoping for and give you some much needed peace of mind.

Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a neuromodulation technique that can reduce pain that is generated by an overly or abnormally firing nervous system (which may occur as a result of the stress and trauma associated with surgery or even a history of chronic back pain). Spinal cord stimulation requires the implantation of a small device (similar to a pacemaker) near the spine. This device emits tiny electrical impulses that effectively prevent pain signals from being sent to the brain.

Physical therapy is another common option for people recovering from back surgery (failed or otherwise). Our physical therapy team can provide specific exercises and manual techniques that promote tissue healing, reduce scar tissue formation and adhesions, normalize the alignment of the spine, improve spinal stability, and maximize the efficiency and motor control of key postural muscles with the trunk and pelvis.

Have you had back surgery and are not satisfied with your post-operative outcomes thus far? Are you looking for effective, affordable, and non-surgical ways to improve your back pain and related symptoms? If so, we invite you to call Progressive Spine & Sports Medicine, Northern New Jersey’s premier multidisciplinary pain management facility serving Ramsey and surrounding communities.

To schedule an initial consultation or to learn more about our comprehensive pain management services, call us today at 201 962 9199.

Physical Therapy Rehab North Jersey

Spinal Stenosis Diagnosis, Evaluation & Treatment with Our Ramsey Pain Doctors

Diagnosis & Treatment of Spinal Stenosis at Progressive Spine & Sports Medicine in Ramsey, NJ

 

With decades of combined clinical experience behind them, Ramsey pain doctors Dr. Kevin McElroy and Dr. Steven Ferrer have worked with hundreds of men and women struggling with dysfunction related to spinal stenosis. If you have recently been diagnosed with this condition or are simply wondering what’s causing your pain, then we invite you to visit Progressive Spine & Sports Medicine for answers–and help.

Spinal Stenosis Diagnosis, Evaluation & Treatment with Our Ramsey Pain Doctors

What is Spinal Stenosis & How is it Diagnosed?

 

Spinal stenosis is a progressive condition that causes a narrowing of the spinal canal and/or spaces between the vertebral bones through which the spinal cord and spinal nerves travel. As this space narrows, nervous tissue can become pinched, leading to a variety of symptoms discussed subsequently.

 

Spinal stenosis can be diagnosed based on a comprehensive physical examination, patient history, and diagnostic imaging. It’s typically caused by degenerative changes in the spine such as arthritis or degenerative disc disease, but in rarer cases may be caused by factors such as trauma, tumors, and certain bone or connective tissue diseases.

What are the Symptoms of Spinal Stenosis?

 

Everyone who comes to see us for help with spinal stenosis tends to present with slight variations in their symptom presentation. The exact signs and symptoms will depend on what’s causing the stenosis, which nerves (if any) are being impinged upon, and how severe the degree of stenosis is.

That said, common symptoms include:

  • Back stiffness
  • Back pain
  • Pain, weakness, and/or numbness in an arm or leg

With stenosis, a person’s back pain and other symptoms may improve if a person bends forwards or walks around a little bit.

In extremely rare cases of severe stenosis, the distal part of a person’s spinal cord may become so compressed that a person experiences symptoms such as incontinence, saddle anesthesia (numbness in the groin and perianal area), and/or sexual dysfunction. This is called cauda equina syndrome and is considered a medical emergency. If you notice any of these symptoms, then call 911 right away.

Interventional Pain Relief Spine Injection

If I Have Spinal Stenosis, What Kind of Treatment Options are Available to Me?

 

At our pain management clinic in Ramsey, NJ you’re more than just your diagnosis. Whether you come to us for help from spinal stenosis or any of the many other conditions we treat, we’re confident that we can devise a custom-tailored treatment plan to meet your unique needs and address your individual challenges.

When it comes to spinal stenosis, typical treatments may include:

The goals of treatment is to reduce pressure on compressed nerves, maximize spinal mobility and spinal joint space, reduce symptoms, and maximize function. We’ll adjust our treatment as necessary to meet your changing needs and help you get back to your normal active lifestyle. In the rare cases where surgery may be indicated, our team can help connect you with the right providers to meet your needs.

 

Have You Been Diagnosed with Spinal Stenosis or Need a Second Opinion? Call Our Ramsey Pain Doctors To Reclaim Your Spinal Health Today

 

Dr. Ferrer and Dr. McElroy, along with the rest of their multidisciplinary team, are committed to helping every one of their patients maximize their quality of life through effective symptom management and prevention of recurring problems. To schedule an initial consultation or to learn more about our pain management services, then call Progressive Spine & Sports Medicine today at 201 962 9199.

 

Spinal Cord Stimulation Ramsey NJ

Spinal Cord Stimulation

Our Multidisciplinary Ramsey Pain Management Team is Proud to Offer Spinal Cord Stimulation for Long-Term Sufferers of Neck & Back Pain

Ramsey pain doctors Dr. Kevin McElroy and Dr. Steven Ferrer, along with the rest of their multidisciplinary pain team, are constantly looking for the most effective and innovative strategies to relieve acute and chronic health conditions like back pain. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is one strategy that has grown in popularity in recent years. While not for everybody, SCS can be effective for many people who are tired of living with debilitating back pain. Read on to learn more about this procedure and if it’s right for you.

What is Spinal Cord Stimulation?

Also known as neurostimulation, spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a process that modifies or blocks noxious (painful) signals transmitted by the nervous system, minimizing or even preventing the sensation of pain. This non-medicinal, pain-relieving effect is achieved by a small electrical device, which is implanted near the spine. Much like a pacemaker, the SCS device elicits mild electrical impulses; in this case, these impulses are used to keep pain signals from reaching the brain (conversely, the impulses from a pacemaker are used to regulate a person’s heart beat). The strength, type, and frequency of these electrical impulses can be controlled and adjusted via a handheld device, reflecting the fact that a person’s pain levels may fluctuate at various times.

The SCS procedure is reversible; a person can always opt to have the device removed without causing permanent changes to the spine or nervous system. Research has shown that spinal cord stimulation has also helped people reduce their use of pain medications including opioids, which are known to have a host of adverse effects.

Who is Spinal Cord Stimulation For?

SCS shouldn’t be considered a first treatment option, but it can help provide effective neck and/or back pain relief for people who have failed to respond positively to other techniques, including physical therapy, chiropractic care, interventional pain injections, and/or back surgery. Spinal cord stimulation has also been used effectively for people who have chronic pain related to complex regional pain syndrome, peripheral neuropathy, and arachnoiditis (inflammation of the protective tissues, called the meninges, that cover the spinal cord and nerves).

Spinal cord stimulation should not be used in certain people, including people who already has a demand-type cardiac pacemaker, people with psychiatric conditions (such as severe depression) that may be influencing pain, and people with certain infections, untreated bleeding disorders, and untreated drug/opioid addictions.

Is it Safe?

Spinal cord stimulation is a minimally invasive procedure and has little to no side effects compared to other pain management strategies. Complications and/or malfunctioning of the device may occur, however the risk of this is considered minimal. Overall, research suggests that spinal cord stimulation is a safe and effective procedure, one that is performed for around 14,000 people or more every year.

Wondering if Spinal Cord Stimulation Can Help You? Call Progressive Spine & Sports Medicine Today for More Information

Bergen County physicians Dr. McElroy and Dr. Ferrer believe that spinal cord stimulation can be a great option for certain patients struggling with back pain who may not be seeing the results they want from other pain management strategies. To learn more about this technique or to hear about our other multidisciplinary pain relief options including nonsurgical orthopedics and physical therapy, call Progressive Spine & Sports Medicine of Ramsey, NJ today at 201 962 9199.

Physical Therapy Ramsey

Sciatica: Causes, Symptoms & Treatment At Progressive Spine & Sports Medicine

Progressive Spine & Sports Medicine is one of New Jersey’s most comprehensive and advanced pain management facilities. We offer non-surgical orthopedic and therapeutic care to Ramsey and the surrounding Bergen County communities. Back pain and related issues are one of the most common diagnoses our team works with; indeed, research indicates that up to 8 out of 10 of us will experience at least one episode of back pain over the course of our lives.

Throughout their years of clinical practice, Progressive Spine & Sports co-founders Dr. Steven Ferrer and Dr. Kevin McElroy have fielded many questions about one particular health concern known as sciatica. It’s almost a buzz word in the back pain world. Many patients wonder if their symptoms are caused by this disorder, even if they’re not completely sure what the disorder is.

Sciatica: What is it, Exactly?

 

Understanding sciatica requires a bit of understanding about the human spine. In your lower back, you have 2 large nerves which exit on the right and left side of the spinal column. These nerves go on to branch out and provide innervation (sensory and motor) to the right and left leg. These nerves are called sciatic nerves.

Sometimes, one of your sciatic nerves can become impinged or pinched. This can happen due to a variety of factors, including disc herniation, disc bulge, degenerative joint disease, bone spur, or in rare cases a tumor. Another cause of sciatic nerve impingement is a muscle injury known as piriformis syndrome. The piriformis is a muscle in your hip through which the sciatic nerve travels.

Pressure on any nerve can lead to a variety of symptoms. If a sciatic nerve is affected, symptoms can include:

  • Numbness and tingling in the affected leg
  • Pain in the affected leg–often described as burning, shooting, stabbing, or searing
  • Weakness in the affected leg
  • Back pain (though not always!)

It’s important to understand that the phrase “sciatica” doesn’t actually describe a particular health problem itself. Instead, it’s a useful term for describing a syndrome of symptoms that a person may have when the sciatic nerve becomes irritated. Why does this matter? Because determining the exact underlying cause of your sciatica symptoms can help guide treatment. Not everyone with sciatica requires the same treatment. This is true not only because the underlying cause could be different from person to person, but also because symptoms can vary significantly, as well.

Who Gets Sciatica?

 

Certain people may be more at risk for developing sciatica compared to others. This includes anyone with a sedentary job or who sit for long periods of time, people between the ages of 30 and 50, people with diabetes, and people who are overweight.

Non-Surgical Treatment of Sciatica With Our Ramsey Orthopedic & Physical Therapy Team

 

The goal of conservative management of sciatica (and its underlying cause) is to ultimately reduce or eliminate the source of pressure on the sciatic nerve. Once this relief is provided, proper healing and symptom resolution can begin. After determining your underlying diagnosis, our team will be able to customize your treatment plan to maximize your recovery and prevent recurrence. To do this, we may use a combination of non-surgical strategies, including physical therapy, interventional pain injections, myofascial release, acupuncture, and more. We’ll work with you every step of the way to ensure we’re finding solutions that safely and effectively meet your needs.

Wondering if you have sciatica? Tired of struggling with frustrating and debilitating symptoms? Call Progressive Spine & Sports Medicine today at (201) 962-9199 to schedule a consultation.

Preventing & Treating Back Injuries & Pain at the Gym

Low Back Pain: Diagnosis and Treatment

Low Back Pain: Diagnosis and Treatment

 

Back pain doesn’t have to mean a lifetime of suffering. Most causes of back pain can be treated nonsurgically with excellent results. That’s why we’re happy to present this information – in hopes that it will help you live pain free.


If you struggle with low back pain, you’re in good company. Research suggests that 70-80% of the population will experience at least one episode of low back pain over the course of their lifetime. Plus, it’s been listed as one of the top causes of disability and missed work, and can affect people of all ages – though the majority of people who suffer from low back pain tend to be between the ages of 35 and 55, and men seem to be more likely to develop back pain. Other known risk factors include stress and poor coping skills, depression, obesity, smoking, and poor posture or body mechanics.

Episodes of low back pain can resolve on their own, however if left untreated it’s more likely that back pain will recur or develop into a chronic problem. While some people ultimately require surgery to resolve their symptoms, it’s generally recommended that most should explore conservative treatment options first. At our pain management clinic, we offer a variety of non-surgical options including physical therapy, massage therapy, and injections. Our treatment options have made a significant impact on our patients’ function and quality of life, without exposing them to the added risks inherent with invasive surgical procedures.

Diagnosing Low Back Pain: Top Symptoms & Underlying Causes
Low back pain is not a single disease process. Instead, doctors and researchers think of it more like a syndrome that comes with a broad range of symptoms. These symptoms can vary widely from person to person, but the ones most commonly reported by people who suffer from acute or chronic low back pain include:

  • Pain in the lower back, often described as dull, throbbing, aching, or even sharp with certain movements
  • Lower back stiffness
  • Pain that can radiate down into the buttocks, hips, and one or both legs (often described as dull, searing, burning, or throbbing)
  • Muscle spasms
  • Decreased activity tolerance
  • Difficulty sleeping

In many cases, the exact underlying cause of a person’s low back pain symptoms is not always obvious. Interestingly, this is not necessarily a barrier to healing. Current evidence from physical therapy research suggests that designing a treatment plan based on symptoms rather than diagnosis can significantly improve outcomes and reduce disability. This is especially important for those patients who have inconclusive diagnostic results that don’t paint a clear picture of what’s really going on.

That said, it’s still worthwhile to identify the underlying cause a person’s low back pain when possible. Common ways to diagnose a low back problem include imaging studies (like an X-ray or MRI), nerve conduction velocity tests, and special tests performed during a physical exam. Results of these tests may identify one or more unique conditions, the most common of which include:

  • Muscle spasm or strain: damage and inflammation to a spinal muscle, often due to trauma or as a compensation of an underlying injury
  • Ligament sprain: damage and inflammation to a spinal ligament, which holds bones together
  • Disc bulge or herniation: misalignment or damage to one or more intervertebral spinal discs
  • Arthritis: degenerative and inflammatory condition affect joints
  • Stenosis: narrowing of spinal canal
  • Sciatica: pinching and inflammation of the sciatic nerve
  • Scoliosis: an abnormal curve of the spine

Non-Surgical Solutions to Acute and Chronic Low Back Pain
Deciding to undergo surgery is a big deal and requires a lot of consideration and input from your medical doctor, your surgeon, yourself, and even your loved ones. Back surgery is generally only recommended if a person’s back pain has not improved after extensive conservative treatment, and if a specific diagnosis is available. Studies also suggest that people who have wide reaching symptoms – like pain extending into their legs – tend to do better after surgery compared to people with symptoms only in their back.
At our clinic, we believe that surgery should generally be considered a last resort, and we offer several non-surgical options for people struggling with low back pain. This includes:

  • Physical Therapy: We have a staff of board-certified physical therapists who offer a variety of therapeutic options. These may include corrective exercises to increase the strength, flexibility, and endurance of your postural muscles; spinal decompression and joint mobilizations to reduce pressure on spinal discs and nerves; modalities like ultrasound, electrical stimulation, and ice to relieve pain and inflammation; and body mechanics and postural re-training to prevent recurrence.
  • Massage Therapy: Our licensed massage therapists promote healing by relaxing muscle spasms, mobilizing soft tissue, and increasing blood flow and lymphatic drainage around the low back. Massage therapy also has a positive and calming effect on the brain, which can promote better sleep, stress relief, and improved mood.
  • Injections: Steroids are a powerful anti-inflammatory medication. When injected into your spine, these steroids can significantly reduce pain, swelling, and inflammation. Not only can this relieve your symptoms, but it can also allow you to participate more with your physical therapy, further maximizing your functional outcomes.

Are You Ready to Take “Back” Your Health?

We are a comprehensive Pain Management and Sports Medicine clinic offering non-surgical solutions to low back pain and other causes of dysfunction for the people of Ramsey, NJ and surrounding communities in Bergen County and NYC. If you or a loved one is struggling with low back pain, call our staff today to request an appointment or to learn more about our services. We look forward to working with you, and helping you live pain free!

Herniated Disc Spine and Nerve Injury

Common Injuries: What is a Herniated Disc?

Common Injuries: What is a Herniated Disc?

 

This post is part of our ongoing series to educate our patients about common injuries and how they can be treated with our nonsurgical techniques. It’s all part of our commitment to helping you live pain free.


Herniated discs affect millions of Americans and is one of the leading causes of low back pain. A disc is the cushion between the bones in the back. Normally there is a tough outer part (the annulus) that keeps the softer inner part (the nuclues) inside. It is very similar to a jelly doughnut where, under normal conditions, the jelly remains inside the doughnut. A disc herniation is when the nucleus (the jelly) pushes through the annulus (the doughnut).

Illustration showing herniated spinal disk

What are the symptoms of a herniated disc?

Symptoms can vary for each patient. Many people have disc herniations without knowing it. Herniated discs can occur anywhere in the spine, but is most common in the low back and can cause any of the following:

  • Neck or back pain
  • Pain radiating to the arm or leg
  • Numbness or tingling
  • Weakness
  • Difficulty with urinating or having a bowel movement

What causes a herniated disc?

Most disc herniations occur between the ages of 30 and 50. There are two main reasons herniations occur in this age group. The first is that the discs loss some of their water content as a person ages. This causes them to be more susceptible to tearing, which allows for the inside disc material (the nucleus) to herniate. The second reason is that the posterior longitudinal ligament, which is the ligament in the back of the discs that helps to keep the discs intact, begins to generate and makes the discs more likely to herniate.

It is more common to not know exactly when the disc was herniated, but some patients can feel a disc herniated when lifting and twisting or from trauma, like a car accident.

How is a herniated disc diagnosed?

Our pain management doctors in Ramsey, NJ can easily diagnose a herniated disc. You will be asked questions about your pain including when it started, what it feels like, and what makes it better or worse. Your doctor will examine you and will focus on feeling your neck or back while also checking your strength, sensation, and reflexes. The history and physical exam is usually enough to make the diagnosis of a herniated disc, but other testing may some times be required, especially if your pain doesn’t improve with appropriate conservative treatment.

  • X-ray – A herniated disc can not be seen on x-ray, but an x-ray is a valuable tool in helping to assess other causes of pain incluiding a fracture or arthritis.
  • MRI – An MRI is the gold standard for assessing a herniated disc. The detail in an MRI allows your doctor to see which disc is involved and which nerve may be affected.
  • EMG/NCS – Electromyography and nerve conduction studies are examinations of your body’s muscles and nerves. The advantage of this exam is that it assesses the actual function of the nerves that can be affected.

How is a herniated disc treated?

Most patients improve with conservative treatment and very few require surgery. Medications that have been proven to be effective include anti-inflammatories and muscle relaxants. The most important aspect of treatment for a herniated disc is physical therapy. The initial focus of physical therapy is on pain relief. Once that is accomplished, the patient will progress to working on range of motion and strengthening the core muscles in the low back, hips, and abdomen.

If conservative treatment does not result in improvement in your pain, an epidural injection may be recommended. Epidural injections deliver potent anti-inflammatory medication directly to the site of the disc herniation and irritated nerve. These injections are done with live spinal imaging to help guide the needle safely to the site of the disc herniation.

At Progressive Spine and Sports Medicine, we specialize in nonsurgical pain management, and a herniated disc is just one of the many injuries we diagnose and treat in our Ramsey, NJ medical center. For more information, please see our full list of our nonsurgical services, or to schedule a consultation, contact us today.

We look forward to being your #1 solution for nonsurgical pain treatment.

Preventing & Treating Back Injuries & Pain at the Gym

How to Avoid Back Injuries at the Gym

How to Avoid Back Injuries at the Gym

 

Prevention is the most important alternative to pain management. Learning how to prevent back injuries, and taking the time to perfect your form can save you from years of dealing with pain. That’s why we’re happy to present this information – in hopes that it will help you live pain free.


Exercise is an important part of your weekly routine – for the sake of your overall health and wellbeing – but nobody wants to put themselves at risk of long term pain and discomfort. Developing a back injury at the gym may prevent you from achieving your fitness goals, and worse, it could make day-to-day activities uncomfortable and painful. Fortunately back pain doesn’t have to be part of the program – that’s why it’s important to take the right precautions and preventative measures when working out.

Some of the most common back injuries for people who lift weights are targeted in the lumbar region and the lower spine, and these injuries can lead to serious problems – especially if left untreated. Sooner is always better when it comes to back and spine injuries, so if you are experiencing back pain, we recommend you contact us or call (201) 962-9199 to book an appointment at our medical facility in Ramsey, NJ where we’ll be able to diagnose and treat your condition – without the use of surgery.

The Importance of Staying Healthy

One of the most important things you can do to avoid back injuries at the gym is to maintain a healthy weight. Having extra weight on your spine may cause the discs to bulge and eventually become damaged. Reducing the weight that is supported by your spine will reduce the wear and tear on the disc and prevent future pain and discomfort.

Another health concern comes from cigarette use, which can alter the chemical structure of your intervertebral discs, leaving them vulnerable to rapid dehydration. As a result, these discs can become brittle, which increases the risk of tearing. For this and many other reasons, you should try your best to stop smoking.

Start at the Core

Another way to reduce the risk of back injury at the gym is to develop a strong “core” region. Your core is a collection of muscles that starts with your midsection, but it extends beyond just your abs – including muscles like obliques, rectus, transversus, and psoas muscles in the abdomen, along with back muscles such as the quadratus lumborum and paraspinals. A strong core is essential for a healthy, pain-free back because these muscles work together to provide support for your spine and skull.

Choose Your Routine Carefully

Some gym exercises can be more punishing on your body than others, and some should be limited or avoided altogether (without the assistance of a certified personal trainer). For example, Military Presses and Weight Assisted Lunges should be largely avoided, as they can compress the spine from the head area.

Overexerting yourself with too many reps or too much weight can lead to pain and discomfort, so always be sure to know your limits and work with a friend or spotter to keep you safe. It’s also important to make sure that you are maintaining the correct form and performing your exercises the correct way. When in doubt, ask. For example, one of our back specialists at our Ramsey, NJ facility will be able to show you the right way to exercise for your particular goals.

Don’t Ignore It

It is important to understand that back pain can be an indication of a more serious injury, when pain starts to manifest you should take note of your symptoms and see a specialist. Your instinct might be to fight through the pain and discomfort, but you may be setting yourself up for serious problems in the future – it’s not worth the risk!

To learn more about avoiding back injuries at the gym, and what you can do to eliminate back pain, talk to one of our doctors or physical therapists at Progressive Spine & Sports Medicine today by calling (201) 962-9199.

At Progressive Spine and Sports Medicine, we specialize in nonsurgical pain management, and back pain and spine injuries are just a few of the many conditions we diagnose and treat in our Ramsey, NJ medical center. For more information, please see our full list of our nonsurgical services, or to schedule a consultation, contact us today.

We look forward to being your #1 solution for nonsurgical pain treatment.